The Millennium Institute - Its Radical Agenda for the 1999 Parliament of World Religions

By Lee Penn

Summary:

The Parliament of the World's Religions (PWR) will meet again in the first week of December, 1999. The PWR says that it is seeking "the moral and ethical convergence that leads to shared commitment and action" for everybody on the planet. The PWR is conducting this effort in close association with an American think tank, the Millennium Institute - which itself is on friendly terms with the United Religions Initiative, the State of the World Forum, and the proponents of the Earth Charter.

Unfortunately, the agenda and beliefs of the Millennium Institute and its founder, Dr. Gerald Barney are politically-correct nonsense: population control, world economic planning, opposition to "patriarchy," the assertion that Christianity and other traditional religions are "not sustainable," a warning that "It is destructive folly to think that we humans are 'created in God's image'," and - at the same time - the assertion that "We humans have become co-creators of the future with the Divine." To top it all, Gerald Barney believes that "The year 2000 ... may be humanity's best chance to start the change, to become the year zero of the sustainable era for the future." (956) The year zero!?! Barney's plan to restart the calendar to mark a social revolution has disreputable precedents - including the Jacobins in the French Revolution, and the Cambodian Communists under Pol Pot.

5,200 words/35 footnotes/10 pages

Conditions of use:

This story is an extract from a book-length manuscript by me titled "False Dawn, Real Darkness: the Millennial Delusions of the United Religions and the New Age Movement." You may re-distribute this story by hard copy or electronically, and you may abridge or quote from this story - IF you give credit to Lee Penn as the author, and IF you include - in the body or as a footnote - the following statement:

"An abridged version of this information is appearing in the series of articles titled "The United Religions Initiative: Foundations for a World Religion" (Part 1 and Part 2). The first article was published in the spring of 1999, and the second part is being published in the fall of 1999 by the Journal of the Spiritual Counterfeits Project. You may order the complete stories from the Journal, or subscribe to the Journal, by calling (510) 540-0300, or by writing to the Spiritual Counterfeits Project, Post Office Box 4308, Berkeley, CA 94704, or by visiting the SCP web site, http://www.scp-inc.org/."

Story:

Gerald Barney and the Millennium Institute

The Parliament of World Religions and the Millennium Institute

>From December 1 through December 8, 1999, the Parliament of World Religions (PWR) will meet in South Africa. The Parliament says, "At the 1999 Parliament, thousands of people from around the world ... come together to experience astonishing spiritual and cultural variety, to exchange insights, to share wisdom, to celebrate their unique religious identities; in short, to be amazed, delighted, and inspired. At the same time, participants wrestle with the critical issues facing the global community, learning about the world situation, and seeking the moral and ethical convergence that leads to shared commitment and action." (1) The Parliament will have a partner in its quest for "moral and ethical convergence" - the Millennium Institute, an American think tank. The PWR says, "The Council for a Parliament of the World's Religions -- in partnership with the Millennium Institute -- is seizing this unique opportunity to inspire individuals, organizations, nations, and religious and spiritual communities to offer strategic "millennial threshold" gifts which will make long-term differences within the planetary community." (2)

The Millennium Institute's association with the United Religions Initiative (URI)

Let's take a closer look at the beliefs of Gerald Barney, president of the Millennium Institute.

Although Gerald Barney is not directly affiliated with the URI, the URI charter writers saw fit to recommend one of his books, Threshold 2000, as a resource for study. Barney's book is one of several - along with Bishop Swing's The Coming United Religions - which is offered for sale in a CoNexus Press leaflet distributed with the Spring 1999 issue of URI Update. (935) The Millennium Institute is supported by the Temple of Understanding and the Council for a Parliament of the World's Religions, which also support the URI. (936) The 1998 State of the World Forum said that "the World Bank and Millennium Institute partnership" is "leading the way forward" in perfecting "computer modeling of human development within nation states and integrated modeling of the global economy." (937) In turn, the Millennium Institute's calendar of "millennium threshold observances" for 1999 through 2001 lists - among others - events sponsored by the United Religions Initiative, the State of the World Forum, and the sponsors of the Earth Charter.(938)

The goals of the Millennium Institute

Like the writers of the Earth Charter, the Millennium Institute has the goals of

* "cutting consumption, waste, and pollution everywhere to levels that are possible for all to replicate; * reducing the world's annual population growth from 90 million to near zero while also increasing the quality of life of the world's poor."(939)

To move mankind in the desired direction, the Institute is "developing a world strategic plan - the Millennium Report to the World - for achieving sustainability for Earth, and encouraging the use of realistic planning models by the nations of the world."(940) The Institute is also offering a "realistic planning model" for the world's use, Threshold 21. In their own words, the model "integrates the human, economic, and environmental effects of policy decisions that influence the course of a nation's development." (941) The Institute says that it has:

"helped 40 countries analyze their current situation and, using the Threshold 21 computer model he [Dr. Gerald O. Barney] has developed, to prepare long-term sustainability studies. He sees all nations on Earth entering this planning process."(942)

Let's repeat that: "he sees all nations on Earth entering this planning process." No exit, no escape.

During an interview with Share International (a Theosophist journal that promotes the cause of Benjamin Crème and of "Maitreya," a camera-shy Antichrist wanna-be), Barney makes it clear that inhabitants of the developed countries are fat, lazy, and guilty of over-consumption:

"In the industrialized countries we cannot continue with over-consumption. The resources and the environment are not going to tolerate that. The earth is not going to tolerate it. But beyond that, it is not good for us. Our health suffers, we do not get enough exercise, we eat too much fat, and we are setting a very bad example for others." (943)

Perhaps our future masters will mandate the Dr. Ornish fat-free diet for us all. ...

The Millennium Institute's challenge to Christianity

After condemning the habits and the lifestyle of the middle and working classes, Barney tells the readers of Share International that Christianity and "many other faiths" are "not sustainable":

"I was not just joking when I challenged the faith traditions to ask themselves, are they a sustainable faith? I am certainly persuaded that Christianity, as it is commonly practiced and institutionalized at present is not sustainable. That [Christianity] is my own faith. But I have to say that, from what I know of many other faiths, I do not think they are sustainable either. The origin myths, the destiny myths, the idea of fertility, not just for the land, but for humans - those are, in effect, elements of the dream of who we are and where we are. Those need serious re-examination. Religion is a key part of our problem. There is a great smugness in virtually every faith saying: 'We have the answers, we know the truth.' The truth, as collectively we have been experiencing it so far, is getting this whole planet into disastrous trouble." (944)

Dr. Gerald Barney's Global 2000 Revisited includes a chapter on "The Role of the Faith Traditions" in the transition to a new planetary order. He blames the religions for "acts of hatred and violence," and nevertheless says that humans "have become co-creators of the future with the Divine":

"Of the fifty plus armed conflicts in progress currently, the majority are motivated in significant part by hatred of the followers of one faith for the followers of another faith. ... What faith is now not involved in acts of hatred and violence in one or more of the 48 religious and ethnic wars now in progress? ... Collectively, we humans are an important part (but not the only part) of the consciousness of Earth. ... We know now that the characterizations of man and woman, male and female, in the origin stories and traditions of many faiths are factually wrong and socially destructive. ... We humans have become co-creators of the future with the Divine."(945)

In the first section of Global 2000 Revisited, Barney calls upon the "faith traditions of the world" to lead the movement for worldwide social change:

"Life for billions will be more precarious in the 21st century than it is now - unless the faith traditions of the world lead the nations and peoples of Earth to act decisively to alter current beliefs and policies."(946)

Barney has a list of questions for each and all of the faith traditions. These questions presuppose that the agenda of leftists, social democrats, environmentalists, and feminists in Europe and North America should be the agenda for us all:

"The questions are welling up from the human spirit struggling to be faithful to the moment, and a faith tradition, if it is to remain viable and relevant, must have answers to the questions welling up in the human spirit. So, in hope and in trust, we turn to you, the carriers of our spiritual wisdom, with our questions.

What Shall We Do?

1. What are the traditional teachings - and the range of other opinions - within your faith on how to meet the legitimate needs of the growing human community without destroying the ability of Earth to support the community of all life? ... b. What does your faith tradition teach about how the needs of the poor and the wants of the rich are to be met as human numbers continue to grow? ... c. How are the needs and wants of humans to be weighed relative to the survival of other forms of life? ... Is the human species justified in efforts to destroy species that limit the human food supply or the growth of human numbers? ... g. [ ... ] How important are high fertility rates of the followers of your faith to the perpetuation of your tradition? How are its teachings to be understood today in light of the rapidly growing human population and the threat that even the present human population poses to the whole community of life? What norms are to be applied to the stewardship of the gift of human fertility? ... 2. What are the traditional teachings - and the range of other opinions - within your faith on the meaning of 'progress' and how it is to be achieved? ... b. What does your faith tradition offer as a vision for the future of Earth? For example, is the future of Earth viewed as a glorious climax, or a terrifying catastrophe, or something else entirely? ... d. What does your faith tradition teach about the human destiny? Is the human destiny separable form that of Earth? ... f. How are we to measure 'progress?' Can there be progress for the human community without progress for the whole community of life? ... 3. What are the traditional teachings - and the range of other opinions - within your faith concerning a proper relationship with those who differ in race or gender (conditions one cannot change), or culture, or politics, or faith? a. Much hatred and violence is carried out in the name of religion. What teachings of your faith tradition have been used - correctly or not - in an attempt to justify such practices? ... d. Discrimination and even violence by men toward women is often justified in the name of religion. Which, if any, of the teachings of your faith have been used - correctly or incorrectly - in this way? e. Many faith traditions are singled out by women today as examples of 'patriarchy.' By 'patriarchy,' women refer to institutions or traditions that have defined man as superior to woman and normative for society. In your tradition, how long ago were the roles, rights, and responsibilities of men and women defined? What do your definitions imply about the superiority of men relative to women? f. Are the current teachings of your tradition about the roles, rights, and responsibilities of women and men changing? If so, how? To what degree are women participating in the change process? g. What does your faith tradition teach about the origin of truth and wisdom? For example, is your faith tradition the holder of the only divinely revealed truth? ... i. Is it the responsibility of your faith tradition to bring your divinely revealed truth to the whole world? Are you to share your faith by example - by living it? Are you to ensure the future of your faith by producing children - more children than produced by the followers of other faiths? Are you to share your faith by teaching? By compelled conversion under the threat of death, 'ethnic cleansing,' crusades, or war? ... 4. What are the traditional teachings - and the range of other opinions - within your faith on the possibility of criticism, correction, reinterpretation, and even rejection of ancient traditional assumptions and 'truth' in the light of new understandings or revelations? a. Does your faith tradition envisage new revelation, new understanding, new interpretation, new wisdom, and new truth concerning human activity affecting the future of Earth? b. What are the most recent revelations in your faith concerning: the human community's relations with the whole community of life on Earth; the disparities of poverty and affluence within the human community; the human concept of progress; the superiority of men over women; and the use of violence toward those of a different faith, culture, race, or gender? c. How does your tradition respond to the revelation from the past 1,500 years of meditation on Earth and its origins - a revelation we usually call 'science?' How will the disciplines of religious and scientific inquiry relate to each other in the future? ... Can science provide new understanding of the primary, original source of religious insight - the universe itself?"(947)

>From the start, when Barney says that the questions arise from "the human spirit struggling to be faithful to the moment," to the finish, where Barney states that the "universe itself" is the "primary, original source of religious insight," the questions are designed to lead the world's religious leaders to reshape their faiths in ways that conform to the agenda of liberal activists from the rich nations of the West.

Barney denies the articles of the Christian faith about the creation of mankind and about mankind's final destiny:

"It is destructive folly to think that we humans are 'created in God's image' and somehow set apart and above the other parts of life on Earth with license to do whatever we might please. The idea is especially dangerous that ultimately all things are going to be put right through an end of this world, a second coming, or some kind of separating us from Earth [sic]'."(948)

In this view, all the religions - especially Christianity - must change in order to meet the requirements of Earth. If it is "destructive folly" to believe that "we humans are created in God's image," then the Bible (Gen. 1:27) is false. If the idea that "all things are going to be put right" through "a second coming" is "especially dangerous," then Jesus taught wrongly (Matt. 24; Mk. 13; Lk. 21; Jn. 5:24-29); Paul the Apostle was deluded (2 Thess. 2); Peter was off base (2 Pet. 3); James was ill-informed (Jas. 5), and St. John the Divine was a liar. If Barney is right when he denies the Second Coming, then the Lord's Prayer ("thy kingdom come") and the Nicene Creed ("He [Jesus] shall come again with glory to judge the living and the dead") are wrong.

Barney holds that a new religious unity must arise, to conform to the demands of a new global society:

"The religions have not successfully been able to transcend their own historical origins so as to express their visions of unity in a fashion appropriate to the needs of the pluralistic global society that is taking form at the beginning of the new millennium."(949)

>From the perspective of the URI, this makes sense; as Anglican Bishop Ottley has said, "the world's agenda is the agenda of the church." (950)

The Institute's call for revolution in "the year zero of the sustainable era"

The Millennium Institute has prepared a "Call to Our Guiding Institutions." Bishop Swing cites this "Call" as one source of a new global ethic,(951) and the Council for a Parliament of the World's Religions will offer the "Call" to the 1999 session of the Parliament of the World's Religions for endorsement.(952)

The Institute's "call" to business and industry includes requests that:

3. "they attend to the needs of everyone before looking to fulfill the desires of the few. 4. they take upon themselves the responsibility to encourage the wealthier nations to reconsider their habits and patterns of consumption. 5. they recognize a World Trade Organization that will establish a 'maximum' wage limit, principles for environmental and human safety, models for the achievement of economic justice, and a code of ethics for business practice."(953)

I would not hold my breath waiting for the World Trade Organization to set and enforce a "maximum wage limit" for Ted Turner, Shirley MacLaine, George Soros, and Maurice Strong.

This "Call to Our Guiding Institutions," asks religions to "speak out and act against hierarchy, patriarchy, and the selfishness that leads people away from a full acknowledgement of Earth's limited resources."(954) This call to "speak out against hierarchy" and "patriarchy" places outside the pale those faiths and traditions who reject the feminist world view, including Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Evangelical Protestantism, orthodox Judaism, and traditional Islam.

Barney has also called on us all to totally revolutionize our thinking and our way of life, to "interchange bad and good, unreal and real" and celebrate the year 2000 as "the event of the whole Earth-time, the whole history of Earth":

"Earth's entry into the next millennium is a planetary 'transitional' event, and as a 'mega anniversary' it has potential for reinforcing the identity of human beings, first and foremost, as citizens of Earth, as 'Earthlings.' This potential must be developed and utilized. ... Earth's entry into the next millennium cannot be just another major event. It cannot even be just the event of a lifetime. Or of a hundred years. Or even of a thousand years. That would not be enough. This must be the event of the whole Earth-time, the whole history of Earth. This must be the moment when humans interchange bad and good, unreal and real, and set themselves and Earth on a new course. Over the next five years all 5 billion plus of us humans must prepare to die to 20th century ways of thinking and being. We must also prepare to see the possibilities and opportunities in our new condition in our new millennium. To make these preparations, all 5 billion of us must devote the next five years to learning from each other about Earth and how to live sustainably and peacefully on Earth. ... Every person must learn to think like Earth, to act like Earth, to be Earth. ... As soon as we humans learn to think like Earth, we together will see a new future for Earth. Then we can die in peace, all 5 billion of us, to our old ways of thinking. We can cross the waters together. And we can celebrate Earth's safe arrival in a new era in a way that will be remembered forever." (955)

Hmmm ... if we are to "act like Earth," then there may be a new legal defense in the future: "Uh, no, Your Honor, I was not sexually harassing her. We're now supposed to 'act like Earth,' and I was having a volcanic eruption." Humor aside, the type of sudden, radical social change that Barney favors has always in the past come with revolution, dictatorship, and mass bloodshed.

As a symbol of change, Barney seizes on the year 2000. "The year 2000, Barney feels, may be humanity's best chance to start the change, to become the year zero of the sustainable era for the future."(956) Here, Barney joins some disreputable company. Others who re-started the calendar at "year zero" included the Jacobins at the time of the Terror during the French Revolution, and the genocidal Khmer Rouge regime.(957)

Some of Barney's environmentalist colleagues are more radical than he is, and openly hate Christianity. This disturbs Barney, since he describes himself as a Christian whose faith is important to his work. Barney reports:

"In the course of my work for the MILLENNIUM INSTITUTE, I have had many conversations with political leaders and with ecologists, economists, geographers, modelers, political scientists, and other leaders about the role of the spiritual traditions in the future of Earth. I have been disturbed by the attitudes that some professionals have expressed toward the spiritual traditions. For example, an internationally famous, highly influential author on sustainable development told me bluntly, 'Religion must die. It is the fundamental cause of virtually all social, economic, and ecological problems and much of the violence in the world.' In another example, an ecologist, who has devoted his life to the practical work of preserving specific endangered species, was equally vehement on his feelings that religion generally, and mine (Christianity) in particular, was a menace to the future of Earth. After I explained the importance of my faith to me in the work I do, he was silent for a moment, and then said with total sincerity, 'You have done some very important work, but just think of how much more you could have done if your parents had not exposed you to the pernicious influence of Christianity!' The attacks on religion generally and mine in particular are not limited to quiet conversations among friends. The editors of Time introduced their 1989 'Planet of the Year' issue with these thoughts: [In the Judeo-Christian tradition, the] earth was the creation of a monotheistic God, who, after shaping it ordered its inhabitants, in the words of Genesis: 'Be fruitful and multiply, and replenish the earth and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the fowl of the air and over every living thing that moveth upon the earth.' The idea of dominion could be interpreted as an invitation to use nature as a convenience. Thus the spread of Christianity, which is generally considered to have paved the way for the development of technology, may at the same time have carried the seeds of the wanton exploitation of nature that often accompanied technological progress.' This is a serious public charge against my faith. It troubles me that the charge was made. It troubles me that it might be true. It troubles me that my faith has made no thoughtful or significant response to the issue raised by Time. Christianity is not alone in coming under criticism. In one forum or another, virtually every faith tradition is being criticized today for not having a thoughtful, informed, penetrating analysis of the issues facing Earth and Earth's human community in the 21st century."(958)

If "virtually every faith tradition" is being criticized by Barney's anti-religious, environmentalist colleagues, we may be close to the condition that Catholic author Peter Kreeft described in Ecumenical Jihad: "a war of all religions against none."(959)

A powerful audience for millennial fervor

Barney and the Millennium Institute have obtained a powerful audience for their ideas. Two high-level United Nations officials have endorsed the Millennium Call for Peace, Justice, and Sustainability: Dr. Wally N'Dow, Assistant Secretary-General of the U. N. Center for Human Settlements, and Dr. Noeleen Heyzer, Director of the U. N. Development Fund for Women.(960) The Institute's "Threshold 21" computerized planning model, based on the World Bank's "Revised Minimum Standard Model," is in use by Bangladesh, (961) Tunisia, the U. N. International Training Center, the UN Fund for Population Activities, UNICEF, (962) the UN "Rio + 5" conference, Georgia, Armenia,(963) Malawi, the Worldwatch Institute, China, (964) the Economic Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, (965) and the World Bank.(966) Organizations and agencies that sent representatives to attend a September 16, 1997 training session on use of the Threshold 21 model were "the Inter-American Development Bank, the World Bank, the Aerospace Corporation, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the President's Council on Sustainable Development, [and] Arthur Andersen & Co."(967) From Malawi to the World Bank and Arthur Andersen & Co. - these people do get around.

A warning from Gorbachev against "the revolutionary way"

Unfortunately, Dr. Barney, the Millennium Institute, and their allies dream of "a new future for Earth." They should heed Gorbachev's warnings about such a revolutionary path. Despite the radical nature of his proposed Earth Charter, Gorbachev issued a cautionary statement when he founded Green Cross International:

"Yes, we must understand human nature in order to live in harmony with ourselves and improve ourselves. But we must not try to recast it or remold it; we must not seek the impossible. The idea of man as a kind of deity is one of the most dangerous and fateful ideas. I am quite sure that it is essential now to understand the limits of the elasticity of human nature, to understand that not only man but also society's life too is unique. It requires that we treat it prudently, taking into account the inherent laws of its development. ... The philosophy of survival presupposes a more serious attitude towards tradition, to what has been tested through centuries. The old assumption - that the most radical and revolutionary actions assure lasting change and progress - was quite wrong. Today, we can say that evolutionary development, the path of gradual reform consistent with the nature of mankind and of society, is more effective than the revolutionary way. ... Struggles and conflicts burn out the diversity of life, leaving a social wasteland in their wake. The revolutionary way does not guarantee constructive development but inevitably results in sacrifice and destruction. The civilization of the future can only be planetary. However, the current processes of the globalization of human existence do not mean, nor will they ever mean, a general leveling of man's thinking and action, for this is contrary to human nature." (968)

Footnotes:

NOTE: Internet document citations are based on research done between September 1997 and August 1999. Web citations are accurate as of the time the Web page was printed, but some documents may have been moved to a different Web site since then, or they may have been removed entirely from the Web.

1 Council for the Parliament of the World's Religions, "Welcome - 1999 Parliament of the World's Religions," Internet document, http://www.cpwr.org

2 Council for the Parliament of the World's Religions, "Offering Gifts of Service - 1999 Parliament of the World's Religions," Internet document, http://www.cpwr.org/gifts.html

935 CoNexus Press leaflet, mailed with the Spring 1999 URI Update newsletter

936 Millennium Institute, "The Millennium Call for Peace, Justice, and Sustainability," Internet document, http://www.cgv.org/millennium/call.html, p. 4

937 State of the World Forum, "Our Common Enterprise II: The Possibility," Internet document, http://www.worldforum.org/initiatives/our_common_enterprise_b.html, p. 10

938 Millennium Alliance, "Calendar of Millennium Threshold Observances, 1999-2001," Internet document, http://www.econet.apc.org/millennium/events/calendar.html, pp. 2, 3, 4

939 Millennium Institute, "The Millennium Call for Peace, Justice, and Sustainability," Internet document, http://www.cgv.org/millennium/call.html, p. 2

940 Millennium Institute, "Backgrounder for News Media," July 1996, Internet document, http://www.igc.apc.org/millennium/pr/background.html, p. 2

941 Millennium Institute, "Threshold 21 Update," December 1997, Vol. 1, no. 1, Internet document, http://www.igc.apc.org/millennium/news/t21upd01.html, p. 2

942 Mac Lawrence, "The Millennium: Threshold for Change," Internet document, http://www.cgv.org/millennium/papers/thresh.html, p. 1

943 Monte Leach, "A wake-up call for religion: Interview with Gerald Barney," Share International Media Service, Internet document, http://www.simedia.org/new/milenins.htm, p. 3

944 Monte Leach, "A wake-up call for religion: Interview with Gerald Barney," Share International Media Service, Internet document, http://www.simedia.org/new/milenins.htm, p. 4

945 Gerald O. Barney, Global 2000 Revisited: The Role of Faith Traditions; Internet document, http://www.cgv.org/millennium/g2000r/faiths.html, pp. 2, 4, 5

946 Gerald O. Barney, Global 2000 Revisited: Overview; Internet document, http://www.igc.apc.org/millennium/g2000r/overview.html, p. 1

947 Gerald O. Barney, Global 2000 Revisited: The Role of Faith Traditions; Internet document, http://www.cgv.org/millennium/g2000r/faiths.html, pp. 6-9

948 Mac Lawrence, "The Millennium: Threshold for Change," Millennium Institute; Internet document, http://www.cgv.org/millennium/papers/thresh.html, p. 2

949 Gerald O. Barney, Global 2000 Revisited: Changing Course, Internet document, http://www.cgv.org/millennium/g2000r/course.html, p. 3

950 Anglican Communion Office at the United Nations, "Annual Report 1997," Internet document, http://www.aco.org/united-nations/annual97.htm, p. 2

951 Bishop William Swing, The Coming United Religions, United Religions Initiative and CoNexus Press, 1998, ISBN 0-9637897-5-9; p. 43

952 Council for a Parliament of the World's Religions, "A New Day Dawning: Spiritual Yearnings and Sacred Possibilities - 1999 Parliament of the World's Religions," Internet document, http://www.cpwr.org/iii/parliament1999sa/index.html, p. 2

953 Millennium Institute, "Call to Our Guiding Institutions, (draft)" Internet document, http://www.cgv.org/millennium/misc/calls.html, p. 2

954 Millennium Institute, "Calls to Our Guiding Institutions (draft)," Internet document, http://www.cgv.org/millennium/misc/calls.html, p. 1

955 Gerald O. Barney, Global 2000 Revisited: Changing Course, Internet document, http://www.cgv.org/millennium/g2000r/course.html, pp. 2-3

956 Mac Lawrence, "The Millennium: Threshold for Change," Millennium Institute; Internet document, http://www.cgv.org/millennium/papers/thresh.html, p. 4

957 Regarding restarting the calendar under Pol Pot: Associated Press, "At the Millennium: Moment by Moment, humanity ticks its history away," June 13, 1998; Internet document, http://www.industrywatch.com/apnews/19980613/15/07/188333_st.html, p. 2; also John Pilger, "The Friends of Pol Pot," The Nation, May 11, 1998; Internet document, http://www.zip.com.au/~nlevine/polpot.htm, p. 1

958 Gerald O. Barney, Global 2000 Revisited, A Letter to Our Spiritual Leaders, Internet document, http://www.cgv.org/millennium/g2000r/letter.html, p. 2

959 Peter Kreeft, Ecumenical Jihad: Ecumenism and the Culture War, Ignatius Press, San Francisco, 1996, ISBN 0-89870-597-7, p. 26

960 Millennium Institute, "The Millennium Call for Peace, Justice, and Sustainability," Internet document, http://www.cgv.org/millennium/call.html, p. 3

961 Millennium Institute, "Threshold 21 Update," December 1997, Vol. 1, no. 1, Internet document, http://www.igc.apc.org/millennium/news/t21upd01.html, p. 2

962 Millennium Institute, "Threshold 21 Update," December 1997, Vol. 1, no. 1, Internet document, http://www.igc.apc.org/millennium/news/t21upd01.html, p. 3

963 Millennium Institute, "Threshold 21 Update," December 1997, Vol. 1, no. 1, Internet document, http://www.igc.apc.org/millennium/news/t21upd01.html, p. 4

964 Millennium Institute, "Threshold 21 Update," December 1997, Vol. 1, no. 1, Internet document, http://www.igc.apc.org/millennium/news/t21upd01.html, p. 5

965 Millennium Institute, "Threshold 21 Update," December 1997, Vol. 1, no. 1, Internet document, http://www.igc.apc.org/millennium/news/t21upd01.html, p. 6

966 Millennium Institute, "Threshold 21 Update," December 1997, Vol. 1, no. 1, Internet document, http://www.igc.apc.org/millennium/news/t21upd01.html, p. 7

967 Millennium Institute, "Threshold 21 Update," December 1997, Vol. 1, no. 1, Internet document, http://www.igc.apc.org/millennium/news/t21upd01.html, p. 8

968 Green Cross International, "The Founding Speech of Green Cross, by President Mikhail Gorbachev," Kyoto, Japan, April 20, 1993, Internet document, http://www4.gve.ch/gci/GreenCrossFamily/gorby/FoundingspeechGorbi.html, p. 5

 

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